Celebrate! Silly Snowmen Stories

Find more celebration posts at Ruth’s blog.

Teaching writing is hard work. Every classroom of students presents unique and different challenges for the classroom teacher. This year I am teaching kindergarten for the first time, and working alongside these little learners has proven to challenge me in ways I did not anticipate.

Simply holding a pencil for some of my students is a challenge. Others arrived in my room with stories already churning inside of them, eager for pencil/marker/crayon and paper. Between those ends of the spectrum were many who have been slowly finding their way as emergent writers, leaning in during mini lessons, willing to try new ideas in their writing along the way.

I purchased a book at NCTE in November titled Text Structures from Nursery Rhymes. Authors Gretchen Bernbei, Kayla Shook, and Jayne Hover present 53 lessons using nursery rhymes to help our youngest primary grade writers grasp an understanding of text structure in writing. What I love about this book is how they reveal how we can break down simple nursery rhymes to reveal the story telling taking place in them. From there the fun begins, as together, teacher and students apply these elements to their own stories, first in shared writing experiences, and finally to students infusing the structures into their own story ideas.

I am just beginning to introduce these lessons to my budding writers. Over the past 2 weeks we have been focusing on descriptive writing using the nursery rhyme, I’m a Little Teapot. Most of the children grasped the text structure elements in our shared writing, but applying it to their own ideas during independent writing proved challenging for many. At times I felt defeated. Some days as we closed our workshop, I questioned my approach, wondering if we should (or I could!) continue. Honestly, I wasn’t sure I had the stamina to keep trying.

What I have learned in my years of teaching writing in grades 1-3 is that often writing is messy. Many days can be down right ugly. Venturing into new and more challenging work is tricky, but when I have persevered with my students, patiently re-teaching when necessary and adding support  where needed, time and time again they flourish. So when their initial attempts to apply the structure lesson to their own ideas was missing the mark, I decided to try a shared entry point for writing, and have everyone write around the same topic.

Enter Snowman craftivity!

Who doesn’t love a snowman project in the middle of the January doldrums? Our frosty snowman scenes (thanks to a final wash of “magic water” to create a blizzard-like look of snow) were just the inspiration my kiddos needed to share funny stories of their snowmen. 

 

At the close of this week, I proudly poured over my students’ snowmen stories. From my independent writers to those who needed step-by-step support and everyone in between, I could not be more excited to celebrate where each of them are in their writing journey. I won’t say the days we spent this week were all easy, but I will say they were filled with lots of laughs, smiles, and joy as proud writers sat up a little taller when it was their turn to share their writing from the Author’s Chair.

11 thoughts on “Celebrate! Silly Snowmen Stories

  1. This is wonderful! I LOVE how you used the text structure and encouraged your students to put their personality into their writing. Even though it was messy and didn’t always go as planned, you found a way to reach every student and nudge them in a way that made them successful. This is so important to our young writers who are just beginning to develop their own style. These are AMAZING kindergarten stories!! It makes we want to come squeeze them and tell them what an amazing job they did.

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    • Thank you, Kayla – what fun to hear from you and share how your work in the book is impacting students. Your book is going to be a big part of growing my young writers! I see you live in San Antonio – my daughter moved there after college graduation. She loves the Texas sun, but I miss her terribly all the way from Montana. Planning a visit in July though!

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  2. Eliza Thomas says:

    Love this post. Teaching is often all about the long game…your honest post reminds me of this and that teaching is messy…but, you often have to make a mess in order to get that desired outcome. Your writers are soooo lucky to have you guiding their journey, providing the purposeful mess-making, so they can celebrate progress!! Proud of you!! (And, them too!)

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  3. Dani,
    I’m glad you took the time to celebrate your young writers. I appreciate your honesty about the messy work of writing and the way you supported them. Yay for snowmen stories…yay for you!
    Ruth

    Like

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